Summer Road Trip Series: Part VI God’s Protective Hand

By Marianna Boyce

God had graciously paused a thunderstorm to grant us a couple of hours at the Grand Canyon for some breathtaking views. As we were walking to the car after a phenomenal sunset, Gerry mentioned his throat was sore, so our son, Cody, drove the eighty-mile trek back to Flagstaff. The heavy downpour resumed as we were exiting the park.

Gerry dozed in the front seat while I searched my travel app for room availability at Little America Hotel. I fell in love with this eclectic little place during our visit in 2015, but wouldn’t you know, there would be no vacancies this year. The one reservation I should’ve booked months in advance, I didn’t. Being on a whirlwind road trip, I wasn’t sure the exact day we’d arrive—until today.

Rain 2I was disappointed, but more so, I was concerned when every familiar hotel lining Flagstaff’s main thoroughfare also showed no vacancy. Not sure where to go, Cody stopped for gasoline while we determined our next course of action. I ran inside the store to purchase Hall’s cherry-flavored cough drops for Gerry. Clouds were still pouring buckets of water on this crisp, dark night, so I was drenched and shivering, laughing uncontrollably at myself as I jumped back into the car. Gerry also chuckled at my misfortune but appreciated the nice gesture in my attempt to make him feel better.

I finally found a room available at a Hampton Inn further north of our current location. I asked Gerry for his wallet in order to book it. God, on the other hand, had a different plan.

In transit, I pulled out our Chase credit card and entered the requested information into my iPhone. We’d had this card for more than twenty-five years and never had any problems; yet tonight, it declined—four times in a row.

God’s unique warning in something as simple as this declined credit card is no coincidence.

No longer in the tourist section of Flagstaff, we slowly drove through the relentless rainstorm finding ourselves amidst their local nightlife district—clearly the wrong side of town for us. I’m not sure if there was a college or university close-by, but the young, raucous crew was having a blast, unconcerned about the downpour and thunder clapping around them. Most were beyond tipsy as they entered and exited local bars, so we wasted no time turning the car around to head in the opposite direction. I’m sure the hotel further north of this little party district was a nice one, but we were suddenly okay with our current ‘declined credit card’ situation.

Rain 1Our energy levels were completely depleted. I dreaded mentioning there were no hotels south of us for sixty additional miles. Gerry stated we’d be heading south in the morning anyway, so why not get a head start? We both did our part keeping Cody alert as he navigated unfamiliar roads in the deluge of falling waters from the sky. I’d never seen so much rain in my entire life. The drive from Flagstaff to Sedona was quite treacherous. Little did we know, it was the beginning of monsoon season for North America.

Monsoons originate in Mexico. They quickly form when seasonal shifts in wind direction create an entirely different type of weather pattern. These nasty storms push into the southwestern states and are quite dangerous—especially with flash flooding. We were oblivious to the seriousness of the monsoon winds and torrential rain. God saw fit to safely guide us through it all.

I managed to find a delightful room in Sedona at a Holiday Inn using my handy-dandy travel app, but in order to book it, we needed that pesky little credit card. Surely, it had been flagged for suspicious activity, so I suggested using another card. Gerry, however, was adamant in using the one rejected earlier. With a smirk on my face, I shook my head the entire time thinking it would decline again. This time, he verbally called out the card number, expiration date, and CVV code, as I re-entered them into my iPhone.

I quickly sat straight up in my seat, dropping my phone in the process. I wiped away the smirk as my eyes widened and asked, “Wait—what? What’s that expiration date again?”

Gerry’s calm reply was, “October, 2020.”

Fumbling for my phone in the darkness, I giggled and said, “Honey, no wonder the card rejected earlier. I was giving the expiration date as September, not October. What was I thinking?”

I’m almost positive Gerry rolled his eyes as Cody burst out laughing. We were all clearly amused for the bone-headed moment I had earlier as I tried booking a room in northern Flagstaff.

When we entered the parking lot of our hotel in Sedona, we quietly sat in the car for a few moments. Mesmerized by the rain now gently falling from the heavens, we listened to the soothing sound created on the windshield, but the hypnotic state we were all experiencing could’ve also had something to do with our sheer exhaustion.

Selfie With RocksAs we laid our heads on the fluffy white pillows and drifted off to sleep that stormy night, we were all comforted, knowing every single detail unfolded exactly as it should have. Without God’s protective hand, who knows what we may have encountered otherwise.

He had clearly spoken—not audibly, but God was present the entire day. From the splendor and beauty of the sights we’d seen to the minor inconveniences we needed to block our so-called, brilliant plan—He was attentive to our every need. As always, He had everything under control. God reminded us of how our way is not always the best way. When things don’t go accordingly, it may be for our own good. God’s protection thousands of miles from home was His priority for my family—I’m absolutely convinced of it.

I was elated departing Sedona the following morning on a beautiful, sunshiny day. We were less than six hours from the sole purpose of this entire road trip. It would be our final destination before heading back to the Palmetto State of South Carolina, and I could hardly wait…

Summer Road Trip Series: Part V All Things Grand – A Sunset for the Ages

By: Marianna Boyce

After driving 2,000 miles in forty-eight hours, we were on target to see one of the seven natural wonders of the world before nightfall. I’m a fool for amazing sunsets, so having a unique opportunity to witness one at the Grand Canyon in Arizona was a gift from God Himself. Rest assured, this particular visit was unlike any other.

Before unpacking my personal experiences, I’ll share a few interesting tidbits of information about this internationally famous landmark.

The Grand Canyon was formed millions of years ago. It stretches for 277 miles and is eighteen miles wide. Millions of people from all around the world choose to visit this popular destination each year.

The natural force of plate tectonics and subduction lifted the Colorado Plateau high, and to this day, it remains relatively flat. This uplift was a key element to the formation of a majestic sight, allowing erosion to take over when the Colorado River cut back down into the canyon creating this natural beauty.

grand canyon 2

Gazing into the gorge from lookout points high above, you can see this mighty river—only if you squint. If you didn’t know it was there, you may not even notice it. Some believe there’s no way this itty-bitty river—as compared to the enormity of the canyon—could’ve carved this astonishing sight.

Fossils of fish and sea creatures have been discovered at the top of this famous canyon. This sounds reasonable, especially since the uppermost layer of rock was actually formed at the bottom of the ocean.

Some on the other hand, have said the massive waters of God’s Great Flood in Noah’s day created this gigantic chasm in the earth. Sure, Noah didn’t witness this grand event. God saw fit to place his ark at the top of Mount Ararat in modern day Turkey. Nonetheless, water did cover the entire earth several thousand years ago. Could it be the fossils of fish and sea creatures in the top layer of the canyon are from this historical flood once the waters began to subside?

No matter your belief, the Grand Canyon should be on everyone’s bucket list.

A Double Rainbow to Kiss the Clouds
My Personal Experience

As we approached Grand Canyon National Park, it started drizzling rain. Since the Bible says to pray about everything, Gerry, Cody, and I did just that. We were all confident God could halt the rain, but He must’ve needed to test our faith because the nearer we drew, the heavier the drops became.

As we approached the front gate to purchase our parking pass, we concluded God had a wonderful sense of humor because a heavy downpour had officially ensued, but as quickly as it began, this gully-washer also abruptly stopped. We didn’t see or feel one drop of rain once we entered the park. I wasn’t the least bit surprised. Well, maybe a little…

We slowly drove through the heavily wooded area absorbing the wonder of it all. There were lots of rabbits, squirrel, deer, and elk close by, but no canyon to speak of. Gerry and I were here in 2015 so we already knew, but Cody was curious where this natural wonder was hiding. This great canyon doesn’t visibly appear until you walk around the first bend of the walking path after parking the car. It isn’t there until suddenly, it is.

grand canyonThe initial sight of it is truly awe-inspiring.

It was an hour before sunset so our timing was impeccable; however, we were still contending with a blanket of clouds looming from the thunderstorm that ignited about eighty miles back around Flagstaff. We all surmised a sunset scene might possibly be out of the question, and that would be okay, but we’d no more uttered those words than something miraculous occurred.

The ominous curtain of clouds rolled back as if the portals of heaven opened about the time the sun began to dip behind the canyon walls. The sculpted land masses proudly stood as if they themselves commanded those clouds to clear, but we all know who it was. Only God could have orchestrated such an event.

The late-day sun peeking through after the rainstorm created a brilliant double rainbow that kissed the menacing clouds in the distance. The sunbeams were shimmering on the rim of the canyon walls just before disappearing for another cool night.

When the evening revealed this magical moment, a complete silence fell over the crowd. Time stood still, and in reverence, we all did the same. The splendor God exhibited by revealing such a sunset for thousands of people visiting from all around the world couldn’t have been more perfect.

We witnessed one of the most majestic sights anyone could ever see. I could almost hear the angels singing the “Hallelujah Chorus.”

I certainly didn’t want to miss this moment by looking through a lens on my iPhone, so this sacred picture is unapologetically saved in my mind’s eye.

As we exited the park at nightfall, the temperature dropped dramatically. Once we were safely in the car, it started raining relentlessly—again. We doubled back to Flagstaff to hopefully find a room for the night. That was the plan anyway.

I was amazed how these events transpired, but God wasn’t finished. By the end of this night, He would reveal Himself to us in a very different way. Our safety and protection depended on it…

 

Summer Road Trip Series: Part IV “Take It Easy”

By Marianna Boyce

New Mexico’s rising sun warmed my face, but the brisk wind chilled me to the bone. This made our morning coffee that much more satisfying. It was the best cup we had since leaving the Palmetto State of South Carolina thirty-six hours earlier.

pic 1As our journey continued westward, we crossed the Continental Divide. This is the point where water basins drain into the Pacific Ocean from those that empty into the Atlantic Ocean. Am I the only one thinking this happened at the Mississippi River? Apparently, I am not smarter than a 5th grader.

pic 2Several hours after crossing this Great Divide, we reached Northeastern Arizona to visit the Petrified Forest National Park near Holbrook. This park is known for fossils of fallen trees dating to the late Triassic Epoch. Although very friendly, the rangers are quite protective of their treasures—for a good reason. With more petrified wood than anywhere else in the world, they have a watchful eye on park visitors. It is forbidden to move anything from its original location due to in-situ experiments being conducted by geologists, paleontologists, and archaeologists. Their research is deemed void of scientific value if any fossil is disturbed.

pic 3Those who have found a way to smuggle the 225-million-year-old wood from the park didn’t fare well. “The Curse of the Petrified Forest” is a legend that’s prompted many people to mail it back to the ranger station. This gesture supposedly helps clear their conscience and rid themselves of “streaks of bad luck” they’d experienced since stealing it. A room is dedicated to these “cursed thieves” displaying their “bucket loads of confessions” in the Rainbow Forest Museum at the park. (Facts and quotes provided by Legendsofamerica.com)

We drove through the park getting out only at designated lookout points. There were marked trails to explore so of course, our son walked about a quarter mile into this mysterious realm. Cody is in the blue shirt at the top of the trail in one photo. If you look closely in the other, you can barely see him on the trail. Gerry and I preferred gazing from the lookouts.

pic 6As we peered down into the mountainous desert, it was difficult gauging how big or small anything was. From our viewpoint, everything looked distorted because we were situated in a higher elevation. The clouds billowing just above eye-level casts shadows over the Painted Desert creating a mirage. The manner in which these shadows danced across the vast land made the terrain appear as if it were charred by a forest fire. The effect was quite stunning.

The cool morning transitioned to warm rather quickly, so we were happy having clouds move above us. By early lunch, it was scorching hot. The parking lots for all the lookout stations had recently been resurfaced, so the scent of newly poured asphalt filled the air. Standing in one place too long resulted in asphalt sticking to the bottom of your shoe. It happened to me, and proof of it appeared on the floor mat of my car. I prefer thinking of it as bringing home a little piece of Route 66.

*****

About thirty-seven miles east of Flagstaff, there’s a huge hole in the earth created by a meteor impact 50,000 years ago. Along the lengthy road leading to the crater are massive clay-looking boulders strewn over the terrain. I assume these rocks were blasted to where they now permanently remain after this colossal impact. They appear to be out of place, as they don’t match the natural surroundings.

pic 10The crater itself measures almost a mile in diameter and 560 feet deep. We climbed the steps to stand close to the rim. The photo taken with people standing on the deck gives a little perspective.

The white center is rubble lying above the bedrock with a life-sized astronaut standing next to an American flag. There is no need to zoom in on the photos. This sight cannot be seen with the naked eye. There are free, mounted binoculars on the rail of the deck to see him. Why this is not a National Park is a mystery to me, but it’s well taken care of by the private landowner.

*****

A few miles down the road from this notable impact site is a famous corner you can stand on in Winslow, Arizona. It’s a fine sight to see. This little dot on the map was made famous by the Eagles, so if you’re not familiar with the song, “Take It Easy,” this information probably makes zero sense to you.

There’s not a lot to see, but they have a red flatbed Ford parked on the side of the road, along with a bronze statue of Glenn Frey holding his acoustic guitar. A small gift shop stands adjacent to the corner, and the largest “Route 66” sign is painted in the middle of the two lane crossroads where this historic highway intersects with Winslow’s main thoroughfare. This stop is meant for people who need to take a break from driving, for those who wish to stand on that famous corner, or of course, for those who merely want to get the t-shirt. (We didn’t get photos this year, so I’m sharing a few from last year’s road trip.)

The closer we got to Flagstaff, the taller the trees stood. Strangely, the terrain resembled that of South Carolina. We were mesmerized by the unobstructed dome of blue sky in Texas and New Mexico, but in northwestern Arizona, the enormity of the western skies disappeared behind the brilliant green cover of leaves.

All we could see was the road in front of us. Little did we know what lay ahead…

Summer Road Trip Series Part III: “Get Your Kicks on Route 66”

By Marianna Boyce 

After driving almost seventeen hours, we made our first stop on Route 66 in Amarillo at a humongous Texas-sized wheat field. We parked alongside the road running parallel to I-40 with other weary travelers. We all had the same plan…I just hoped they brought their own spray paint.

pic 2Wind was gusting to about 30 mph, so before getting out of the car at Cadillac Ranch, I put my hair in a messy bun. I was wearing the same blue and white Ralph Lauren dress and cute little white sandals from the day before. My husband Gerry, and son Cody, were also sporting the same clothes from the previous day, but no one cared. We were all having a blast.

I released the trunk to retrieve the lime green spray paint packed before leaving South Carolina. There were some old cars we wanted to leave our mark on before heading further west.

pic 1Cadillac Ranch is a roadside attraction showing the evolution of tail fins on ten, older model Cadillacs. They are artistically displayed about 200 yards off the road, all upright, in a row, with their noses half-buried in the ground. For those that haven’t heard of this quirky little dot on the map, we were not “Breakin’ the Law.” Graffiti is actually encouraged here.

Leaving our mark on this popular landmark proved difficult on such a breezy day, but it was exactly what we needed to break the monotony of driving. After exhibiting our artistic interpretations on several cars, we shared our can of paint with travelers who didn’t come prepared. This attraction is free of charge and open 24/7/365.

Since we skipped lunch, we stopped for an early supper at the Big Texan Steakhouse a few miles down the road. At this bright yellow restaurant with a gigantic, long-horned, bull statue in the parking lot, you can order a seventy-two ounce steak cooked to perfection, free of charge. That’s four and a half pounds, y’all. Oh wait! There is a stipulation. No sharing is allowed, and it must be eaten within one hour. This includes their salad, baked potato, shrimp cocktail, and roll; otherwise, your meal isn’t free. It will cost $72. I wisely chose their six ounce filet, and after our delicious meal, we “Hit the Road Jack.” It was my husband’s turn to take the wheel…

*****

We left the tall green trees behind. They were morphing into smaller bushes. The vast landscape was dramatically changing with nothing obstructing that enormous blue sky. Texas gives an interesting 360 degree perspective. In certain areas, if you concentrate on the horizon, you can see the curvature of the earth. “I Can See For Miles and Miles…” It’s simply amazing!

In this beautiful, strange land, the billowing white clouds not only seem to dip below the horizon, they also stretch far into the heavens. There are no limits to the imagery that unveils like an artistic masterpiece. I love the enormity of Texas with all of God’s glory brilliantly on display, but we kept pushing forward.

*****

pic 3We crossed into New Mexico and made it to our next destination about an hour before sunset. The timing was perfect. Cody wanted to see the Blue Hole of Santa Rosa. This mystical Blue Hole is a natural geological formation created by a network of underground lakes in the middle of nowhere. With a constant inflow of 3,000 gallons of water per minute, it’s an incredible sight to see.

pic 4The surface diameter measures eighty feet, but increases to 130 feet at the bottom, making it a bell-shaped gem. There’s a rock ledge just underneath the water, but it dramatically drops off eighty feet into a mesmerizing, brilliant, blue void.pic 5

There is no lifeguard on duty, but if you’re adventurous, feel free to take a surface dive in the crystal-clear water. Even in their hot summers, this beautiful artesian well is a constant sixty-one degrees.

pic 6Cody was able to take two quick dives. The shock of the cold water instinctively pushed him up in milliseconds. My husband and I weren’t quite as bold. I only dipped my big toe and Gerry chose to merely observe. He’s not keen on anything cold, except for his chocolate cherry ice cream, and southern sweet iced tea. A visit to this interesting oasis is also free of charge and open 24/7/365.

pic 7As we watched the beautiful New Mexico sun setting behind the mountains in the distance, we drove a few miles down the road and found a room for the night. We were all exhausted, so we looked forward to a good night’s sleep before the adventures we’d lined up the following day. We all showered, crashed, and burned. Our plan was to rise early the next morning to see something grand. If we timed this one right, we’d be there a little before sunset as well…

We had an amazing twenty-four hours driving from South Carolina to New Mexico—and all still on speaking terms. Miracle? Not really…just “Love the One You’re With,” and don’t sweat the small stuff. Hopefully, you picked out the song references easily. We sang them all.

Arizona, here we come…pic 8

Summer of 2019: Trial Run of an Empty Nest

By Janet Prince

pic 1This summer, Gary and I have had the opportunity to have a trial run for when we have an empty nest. Our youngest has attended two trips leaving us home alone for the first time in almost 22 years! We have always joked that when the nest was empty, we would start dating again, and we did!

We went out to dinner alone one of the nights. Having time to have dinner alone in a restaurant with out the girls and their friends was a rarity. But of course, what did we talk about? The girls! Our life has always revolved around them and it seemed that not having them with us put us a little off balance. In our little family we have always moved as a unit. We go most places together and even when we are home, the girls have always spent time with us on the porch talking and watching TV. On another date, we made it a double with Ashlan and her husband Joe. It was a lot of fun getting to hear everything going on with them and it let me get my “mama fix”!View of beach at Huntington Beach State Park, South Carolina, USA

Summer has always been a great time to travel and to relax. The beach and the mountains are always our go-to places. We have our favorite places to go eat and our favorite things to do in both mountainsplaces. We always do the same things, but they are things that make us happy and things that the girls always looked forward to. I guess we can be called creatures of habit. Every place holds a special place in our memories.

Summer also means some separate traveling for Gary and me. The last weekend in June each year is when I travel with many others from our state to the GFWC Annual Convention. This year we were in Austin, Texas. We had lots of laughter and catching up with members from across our great country. Although it can be tiring it allows me to come home rejuvenated. Spending time with my girlfriends on these grand adventures is something I look forward to each year. Gary also gets to travel, but his is for work.

Our trial run of an empty nest has been good for us. We have had time to talk about whatever we wanted, and we learned that yes, we will be alright when the nest is really emptied. But for now, we are glad our nest is still full!

Until next time,

Janet

Summer Road Trip Series Part II: “God Bless Texas”

By Marianna Boyce

According to Google, Dallas is the third largest city in Texas, and ninth largest in our nation. In my opinion, it’s the most daunting to navigate. I was a passenger for a previous road trip in 2015 with our daughter and her family and quite honestly, I was awelcome to texas sign nervous wreck. It was nearly impossible to enjoy the mesmerizing sparkling midnight skyline with their intense traffic, but I somehow managed. My heart races just thinking about it.

With this bit of information in mind for our 2016 trek across the USA, I called driving dibs for this enormous metropolis once we reached the city limit sign. I actually insisted. In a meager attempt to persuade my husband Gerry easily, I forfeited the remainder of our driving marathon for him and our son Cody to split between themselves. Surprisingly, they both humored me and agreed to my crazy little deal. Otherwise, my backseat driving alter-ego may have reared her ugly head—and no one wanted that girl on our trip. I could’ve sworn they secretly adored her, but Gerry and Cody both swore they didn’t like her at all, hence my decision to leave her at home. Y’all would be so proud…

After driving all night from Lexington, South Carolina, we closed in on Dallas around lunchtime the following day. This year, we’d see the mega city during daylight hours. As we approached the outskirts, Cody’s driving shift came to a close.

It was lunchtime, but none of us were hungry. We grabbed a pack of cheese crackers and cold Pepsi-Cola from the ice chest and carried on our traditional American, wind-in-the-hair road trip. Finally, it was my turn to drive.

Nervous excitement consumed me, but I’m happy to report, I drove like a pro. The midday traffic was more tolerable than the midnight mayhem the previous year. The intimidating multiple lane roadways were still packed full of cars. I navigated their intricate highway system that in my opinion, resembled a big roller-coaster ride. I loved every exhilarating moment.long straight highway

Exercising such formidable driving ability, Gerry and Cody suggested I continue our quest without stopping for a driver switch. As we exited the Dallas-Fort Worth area, that famously long and straight Texas speed limit 80highway magically appeared out of nowhere. It was right up my alley. This is an area you’d definitely want a full tank of gasoline. There was nothing intimidating here. The speed limit was eighty, so eighty(ish) was what I did.

There are reminders up and down the highway system warning drivers that the left lane is for passing only. After passing, you must safely move back into the right lane. What a novel idea. I wish South Carolina had the same law. Oh, wait! We do! We are merely lacking in the reminder sign department. Where can we start a petition to get those for the Palmetto State? “God bless Texas.”

***

The scenery in this great state is very special. It’s exactly what you’d expect, but in a peculiar way, nothing you’d expect at all. Trains stretch as far as the eye can see. On one side of the road are oil wells. Grandiose wind turbines occupy the other. Chances are, they all belong to the same roughneck or rancher, but who knows? They contradict and complement each other simultaneously. It’s the old and the new, the big and the small. Oh, never mind! There’s nothing small here. The old saying “Everything’s bigger in Texas,” is true. I’ll bet that landmark steeple will never be mounted on a church rooftop.

***

Our course transitioned further north to I-40 via US-287. We were gravitating toward a national historic highway. Maybe you’ve heard of it…

I drove until we reached Amarillo. This is where our road trip took on a life of its own. So route 66far, we’d been driving fast and furious, but join me for my next post where the fun truly begins. What good is trekking across the United States of America unless you experience a little bit of classic Route 66.

Summer Road Trip Series Part I: Go West Young Man

By Marianna Boyce

arizona sign (p1)Have you ever heard of Sierra Vista, Arizona? It’s a great little city in Cochise County about twenty miles north of Mexico, but 1,921.5 miles west of South Carolina. You’ll discover the reason Sierra Vista holds a special place in my heart as we travel west for my summer road trip series.

rocky wall w flag (p2)In a day where everyone is in a hurry to do everything, flying the friendly skies makes more sense, but my preferred method of travel is the traditional American ‘let the top down’ road trip to see the beautiful sights our country has to offer. Gerry and I have done both—many times.

We embarked on this long journey with our daughter Tiffany and her family in 2015. Our son Cody was unable to go with us, but he expressed interest in our taking the same exact route to this special little dot on the map the following year. He knew it wouldn’t take much to convince me of another opportunity to drive west.

I had kept a journal of our original trip, so we easily charted the same course in 2016. It was awesome knowing exactly where we were going and how long it would take to get there; but for this adventure, we made no hotel reservations. We threw caution to the wind and prayed God would protect and have us in the right places at the right times. Talk about faith. Be sure to read my future posts to see how that worked out for us.

Of course, as a woman, I packed everything but the kitchen sink days in advance. It was neatly organized in the dining room waiting for our departure day of June 8. I even packed lime green spray paint…

Gerry was slated to drive the first leg of the trip, so he took the day off to rest while Cody and I worked. Once I arrived home, Gerry neatly arranged everything in the trunk of my light sage-colored Lincoln MKZ. Over the years, I’ve learned this process is much easier when I’m not involved. His goal was to leave the backseat open for whoever needed to rest or just enjoy the ride. The only thing he tossed inside the car was a comfy pillow and my purse.

We planned to leave that evening in order to travel as far as we could while traffic was light. Have you ever driven through Atlanta at lunchtime? Exactly!

After a quick burger, fries, and frosty at a local fast food restaurant for supper, we embarked on our wind-in-your-hair road trip. I chose the backseat to start our journey, but took a silent vow to leave my backseat driving instructor mentality at home. I can’t express how difficult that was for me.

blinding sun (p9)The sun was blinding as it set in the western sky, so I put on my sunglasses, placed that comfy pillow behind my back, and propped my bare feet up on the console in front of me. “Go West, young man,” I recall saying to my husband. “Life is good!”

We drove west on I-20 all night and left South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, and Mississippi in our rear view. There’s not much to see at night, so Cody—being in line to drive—catnapped. My job was keeping whoever was driving awake, but I was still careful to leave my backseat driving wisdom at the house.

early morning sunrise (p11)After twelve hours, we decided to stop in Monroe. The sun was peeking over the eastern horizon, so we thought stopping for a hearty breakfast at Waffle House was a great way to greet the new day. Not to mention, we were also in desperate need of strong coffee.

For those who remember the television show, Duck Dynasty, the Duck Commander store was only a few miles down the road from Waffle House, so we stopped by to see if Phil, Willie, Jase, or Si were there. It was still very early, so their store was closed. We walked around in the parking lot for a few minutes before heading west again on I-20. It felt good to stretch our weary bodies after the long ride.

 

With the first leg of our trip in the books, Gerry took over the coveted backseat to get some much-needed sleep. Cody gladly took the wheel while I rode shotgun. I gave him a gerry sleeping (p13)tough choice between me or Siri as his trusty navigator. He chose wisely: Siri it was.

From Louisiana, we headed toward the great state of Texas. Of course,cody driving (p14) any amazing road trip wouldn’t be quite as good if you didn’t sing, “On the Road Again,” in your best Willie Nelson twang. In spite of mine and Cody’s bellowing, Gerry was asleep in mere moments…

*The photos used in this post are personal photos from my amazing road trip. They may not be the best quality, but they are all near and dear to my heart. Enjoy!*