Tales From Texas, Part 4

By: Elizabeth Webber Akre

TexasClick here to read part 1 of Elizabeth’s “Tales from Texas” series.
Click here to read part 2 of Elizabeth’s “Tales from Texas” series. 
Click here to read part 3 of Elizabeth’s “Tales from Texas” series. 

My culinary journey into Texas ends with the “Texas BBQ” that my sister ordered from T-Bone Tom’s, who enjoyed some Diners, Drive-ins and Dives fame. Of course, here in the glorious South, BBQ means pork, mustard sauce, white bread, coleslaw, hash and rice, and maybe some cracklin’s on the side.  Well, in the great Texas, it’s a whole different ballgame.  They are all about the beef.  Well, hello?  They are Texas, where pretty much all the beef comes from, right?

So the package of a typical Texas BBQ is smoked brisket and sauce, smoked sausage, potato salad, coleslaw, pintos, bread (untoasted Texas toast), pickles and onions on the side. While we don’t typically cook brisket in the South and call it barbeque, I’m a big brisket fan.  I love corned beef so much I check the prices on it every time I’m in the grocery store.  I love meats that “string” when they are cooked.  I was really looking forward to this food.  My brother-in-law picked it up and I helped set it all up on the table for my sweet niece’s 3-year-old birthday party. I’m not sure how many of the other pre-schoolers got their fill of Texas BBQ, but the rest of us were in good shape.

The brisket was simply fantastic: smoked, that nice dark “bark” on the outside and perfectly cooked.  The sauce was a red sauce, of course, because the rest of the world hasn’t discovered the magical versatility of mustard like we have! I’m sure the smoked sausage was great, but being a less-than-enthusiastic sausage eater, I didn’t try it myself. The potato salad was a pretty typical old-school style, as was the coleslaw, but the pinto beans were awesome.  I guess you’d say they were pretty much the “charros” that you find so often in this part of the country. While all the grown-ups polished off most of the barbeque, the toddlers turned their attention to my niece’s very elaborate fondant-covered dragon cake.  Fine, kids.  Eat your cake.  We’ll handle this brisket!

My first trip to Texas was really great.  I was able to spend great quality time with (most of) my family (my husband couldn’t get away and come with us 😦 ).  Taking my child to NASA was an awesome experience and I know she learned so much. Frankly, so did I.  Visiting the Kemah Boardwalk was fantastic.  Vivver wanted to ride the Boardwalk Bullet roller coaster.  She was tall enough to ride, so off we went.  It is a major league coaster and when it was all over, she was in tears.  But, by the end of our day there, she bolstered herself up and wanted to do it again.  She did fine and confessed to me later that it was her mantra “I’m ok, I’m ok, I’m ok” that got her through it and actually allowed her to enjoy the crazy thrill. 🙂

ElizabethElizabeth writes “Gastronomy (by a Wanna-be Chef)”. Follow the page on Facebook. All the cool kids do.

Tales from Texas, Part 3

By: Elizabeth Webber Akre

Click here to read part 1 of Elizabeth’s “Tales from Texas” series.
Click here to read part 2 of Elizabeth’s “Tales from Texas” series. 

TexasI guess growing up, I always thought of Texas as being nothing but desert, cattle farms and oil rigs. Well, lo and behold, Houston is coastal.  Who’d-a-thunk it?  I mean, I know how to read a map, but for some reason, it surprised me to see so much water and “beachiness.”

The first night we were in Houston, my sister and brother-in-law decided to take us to “the place under the bridge.”  Turns out this is really called Outriggers Oyster Bar & Grill.  Casual, on the water, just across the way from Kemah Boardwalk, and yes, under the bridge.  Apparently, we are in the midst of crawfish season (it was driving them all crazy when I called them crawdads, so of course, I called them crawdads on purpose!).  As we struggled with the children’s menu, my sweet 7-year-old gourmand heard “crawdads” and said, “That’s what I want!”  My mom and I chose the shrimp and avocado appetizer, sister got shrimp tacos, brother-in-law opted for Tilapia Veracruz and my dad selected the oyster Po-Boy.

Mine was fab-oooo!  It was slightly spicy broiled shrimp over two avocado halves atop shredded lettuce, all dressed with a wonderful remoulade.  Vivi’s crawfish were delicious and tender, but were pretty generously coated with spices on the shells.  She made it through about eight of them before the cumulative effect of spice hit her.  I must admit that when I requested a glass of milk for her, I was surprised to be told they have no milk.  I said to the waitress, “Wow, so you don’t serve any White Russians here, huh?” and was horrified when she said sure they do, but they make them with creamer.  **Note to self-don’t order a White Russian here.**  My brother-in-law’s fish was beautiful and he didn’t leave a bit on that plate and he didn’t share a bite with me either L My sister reported that the shrimp tacos were awesome, but my poor dad was disappointed.  His oysters were so overly breaded that he couldn’t even taste or appreciate any oyster.  He was disappointed, to say the least.

But, overall, this is a great restaurant.  I think my dad would have been much happier if he’d ordered what mom and I had.  I bet next time we go, he will, unless he’s already stopped at the Kroger and loaded up on tamales!

ElizabethElizabeth writes “Gastronomy (by a Wanna-be Chef)”. Follow the page on Facebook. All the cool kids do.