Anyone Else Stuck in a Rut?

By Tina Cameron

blue tape measuring on clear glass square weighing scale

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For the past month, I have been stuck in a rut. I’ve been unmotivated, a little sad, eating my feelings, and the scale showed it today when I went in for my yearly cardiology appointment. I did so well last year and lost 26 pounds. Well, I have gained 29.5 since this time last year. This is completely unacceptable. I am an emotional eater. I can admit this and I know what I need to do to lose weight, but I was not motivated until I saw my doctor. He politely said, “Yes, you do need to lose some weight.” He did not give me a number. He just said not to buy the junk and added, “there will not be anything bad to snack on if you don’t buy it.”

So, after I finish writing this blog, I am taking the dogs on a walk. I am a little nervous about this, as the last time I took all three for a walk, one got loose and ran away. Then, the other got loose, but (thank goodness) she sat down when I called her name. The third dragged me until I was physically worn out. Chasing one and trying to control the other two was already a workout.

If anyone wants to jump on the “healthy eating, no more snacking, feel better, get off the couch and out of your pajamas” pandemic train, please send me an email at the address below. I am going to go through my pantry and freezer tonight, and make a list of goals, meal planning, and exercises to start. I have an app on my phone to keep track of my meals, water, and exercise. I plan to start tracking again, too. I would love to have someone do this journey with me. So, if anyone is interested, we can do this together. I am tired of being in this rut.

I am wishing everyone the best. Stay safe. Email me at tmcameron@crimson.ua.edu.

Mixed Emotions

By: Marianna Boyce

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For now, the thought weighing heavily on my mind is staying healthy. It’s not a selfish thought. We’re all working diligently to fight this invisible enemy. Other than the obvious—overall good hygiene, washing hands, and coughing or sneezing into a tissue or bend of our elbow—the bottom-line answer to this situation is to simply stay home.

But what if your place of employment remains open for business? What then?

It was a sobering thought as I read the memo given to me Friday afternoon before my commute home. I received my “authorization to travel” in the event the surrounding areas enforced a “shelter in place” order. The top line of the memo reads, “Critical Industry Employee, Authorization to Travel.” A statement in the body of the memo reads, “if you work in a critical infrastructure sector as defined by the Department of Homeland Security, you have a special responsibility to maintain your normal work schedule.”

As crazy as it seems, my plan is to do just that.

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Photo by Artem Beliaikin on Pexels.com

I’m the senior administrator for a large insurance company. Working for such a firm guarantees I’ll have plenty to keep me busy while others are hunkered down at home. Don’t get me wrong. This makes me happy, but extraordinarily sad at the same time.

I’m not particularly fond of being considered an “essential” employee. In my opinion, everyone’s place of employment is essential. I truly hate for any business to be closed. What makes my job more important than yours? Nothing, my friend, absolutely nothing. It’s as frustrating to me as it is to you, but while many of you wish you were able to go to work, I secretly wish to be hunkered down at home.

Before Coronavirus, my mantra was to crawl in sick as opposed to call in sick, but since COVID-19 entered the scene, I’ve totally changed my opinion on the matter. So far, I’ve been well, and taking extraordinary precautionary measures to stay that way, but the mental battle to choose work over home is still grueling. I have plenty of PTO time I could take, yet I’m more inclined to work.

My coworkers and I have put many social distancing rules in place. We wash our hands constantly. Hand sanitizer and latex gloves are always within reach. Lysol wipes and spray are always close by for us to use; although, the rationing has begun…

Watching the world being brought to her knees in a matter of a few weeks is surreal. The entire ordeal feels like a terrible movie, and we’re all the stars of the show. Public enemy number one is on the rampage, and no one has the answer in combating such a vicious virus. I think we’re close, but not quite there yet.

When the worst has passed (and it will), we will never be the same. As a people, we will be different. In my opinion, we will be greater. As was the case of September 11, 2001, America will adopt a new normal—but what will it be? That remains to be seen.

All I know for sure is, God is good all the time. He’s never surprised by anything, and always in control. We’ll make it through. Stay strong my friend, and if at all possible—stay home!

Coronavirus and Pregnancy

By Lexington Medical Center

gray scale photo of a pregnant woman

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

Pregnant women may have many questions about coronavirus. In a recent WLTX interview, Dr. Paul Browne talks about what expectant mothers should know about the virus. Dr. Browne is an OB/GYN at Lexington Maternal Fetal Medicine, a Lexington Medical Center physician practice. He specializes in high-risk pregnancies.

If the video does not work, you can watch the interview here: Dr. Paul Browe on WLTX: Coronavirus and Pregnancy

 

Has It Ever Occurred to You, Nothing’s Ever ‘Occurred’ to God?

By: Marianna Boyce

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Before ‘Coronavirus,’ ‘social distancing,’ and ‘flattening the curve’ became household words, I planned to submit a comical post written about technology and the older generation, but as the past few weeks began to unfold, I felt it wouldn’t be appropriate at this time.

The title of this particular post is a statement I’ve often heard my dad say, and no, nothing suddenly dawned on God. He didn’t just ‘wake up’ one morning and say, “Wow—I didn’t see that one coming.” Although I find much comfort in that, uncertainty is still somewhat unnerving. This unprecedented crisis developed in breakneck speed, not only in the United States of America, but also around the world.

It’s no secret America is at her best when we all stand together as “one nation, under God, indivisible…” but prayer is the key. Our country was founded on biblical principles. Praying to an all-knowing God has gotten us through some very difficult times in the past, and I have no reason to believe He won’t do the same now.

My pastor says that prayer is the slender nerve that moves the hand of God, but in my opinion, it shouldn’t take a global pandemic to get America back on her knees, yet here we are.

As we seek God’s face in the coming months, let’s fervently pray for our leaders and those in authority. Like them or not, they have an incredibly difficult job.

Of course, our doctors, nurses, and first responders need knowledge, wisdom, and strength to keep pushing forward.

Our truck drivers tirelessly keep our supply chain moving. I’ve noticed many more on the road in the past week or two, and I’m okay with that. How about you? They’re carrying precious cargo—our food, water, and other essential supplies, including that elusive toilet paper. Let’s be patient when we’re on the road with them.

If you’re working extended hours in our grocery stores to clean, sanitize, and re-stock shelves—thank you. You’ve not been forgotten.

As we practice social distancing from our friends, neighbors, and co-workers, let’s not distance ourselves from a great and mighty God. After we thoroughly wash our hands, lets remember to fold them in prayer for one another—not only for the United States of America, but for the entire world.

“Let us therefore come boldly unto the throne of grace, that we may obtain mercy, and find grace to help in time of need.” Hebrews 4:16 (KJV)

“The Lord is good, a strong hold in the day of trouble; and he knoweth them that trust in him.” Nahum 1:7 (KJV)

This is one of my favorite verses in the Bible. I’d love to know yours.

Lexington Medical Center’s Coronavirus Response

Lexington Medical Center is carefully monitoring the 2019 Novel Coronavirus known as COVID-19 and referred to as “coronavirus” with multiple, local, state and federal agencies.

A multidisciplinary team of hospital leaders and clinicians meets regularly to discuss updated information about the virus, evaluate appropriate responses including supplies, and establish plans for treatment. Lexington Medical Center is committed to providing the best care to patients and community members.

While a new type of illness can be scary, community members can protect themselves by following the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommendations for preventing respiratory illnesses. These include:
·wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after using the bathroom, before eating, and after blowing your nose, coughing or sneezing. If soap and water are not readily available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol. And, always wash your hands with soap and water if they are visibly dirty.
·avoid touching your eyes, nose or mouth.
·stay home when you’re sick.
·cough or sneeze into your elbow or use a tissue and put it in the trash immediately.
·clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces.
·get the influenza vaccine.

The most up-to-date information on the coronavirus can be found on the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention websites at www.scdhec.gov and www.cdc.gov.