Remembering the Sabbath Day

By Chaunte McClure

Growing up in the South, particularly in the Pee Dee region of South Carolina with my grandparents, there were just some things you didn’t do on Sundays. For most of my childhood Grandma and Granddaddy didn’t work, rather they spent all day at home doing his and her tasks. Grandma cooked, cleaned and cared for a few of her grands while Granddaddy kept the yard mowed, tended the chickens and the garden and did handy work in and outside our cinderblock house.

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With the exception of cooking, we completed most tasks by Saturday night because, in our house, they remembered the Sabbath Day and hallowed it. That meant no: cleaning (except dishes, of course), washing clothes, ironing, sewing, cleaning cars or mowing. No one, that I can recall, had a problem with that because that was the norm.

Honestly, I’m not sure if that was a religious or cultural practice, but after living in a larger city, I’ve noticed that for many families, Sunday is the day to get all the housework and yard work done.

In the summer, forget sleeping in a little later on Sunday because the sleep you’ve been longing for all week is bound to get interrupted by the sound of a lawnmower. And because you’re sleeping so well, the mower actually sounds like an antique John Deere tractor.

In my household, we’re guilty of ironing on Sunday mornings because we don’t always choose our Sunday outfits Saturday night. Sometimes I think about Grandma while I stand in the laundry room ironing. I visualize her with her hand on her hip giving me “the look” – the now-you-know-better-than-that look. And I do know better, but I wonder if others don’t or because they are now adults they live by their own rules and not necessarily by what their parents and/or grandparents taught them. For many families, I’m sure Sunday is the only day to get it done because of work schedules.

What about you? Are chores forbidden at your home on Sunday?