Three New Year’s Resolutions for Celiacs

By Rachel Sircy

Well, the New Year has come and it’s the time of year to make lists of resolutions for the coming 12 months. For celiac patients, we have a long list of resolutions that are often hard to keep. A couple of weeks ago, I was having a conversation with my new primary care physician about how difficult it can be to really live gluten free. It seems to me that every time I think that I’ve got the gluten free lifestyle mastered, I find something that I’ve been doing wrong, or that a company that I trusted has changed their manufacturing practices or that I’ve made a bad choice when faced with hunger and eaten something that I knew I shouldn’t.

I also told my new doctor that it’s enough to make me cry sometimes that I cannot find a physician who knows a good deal about celiac disease. Ever since the first day of my diagnosis, I have longed for someone who could guide me through this tangled minefield of gluten intolerance. My doctor suggested, of course, that I try the myriad websites dedicated to the gluten free diet. Of course, I do often consult internet sources for the latest research on celiac disease and gluten intolerance. I pointed out to my doctor that sometimes the information that you look for online can lead to conflicting answers and contradictory advice. What one person says is safe is condemned by another person. Who is right? Most of the time, I try going by my own gut and common sense and hoping for the best.

After thinking these things over, I’ve come up with some ideas that I want to follow through with in 2019. I say that I want to follow through with them because, if I’m being honest with myself and with you, I have to admit I have a real problem with follow-through. Maybe you’ve noticed that if you follow my blog posts. Oops. But, I hope this year to be better than I was both physically and mentally than last year and I think these three resolutions will help me to do that.

  1. Actually keep a food/symptom diary. (Again, I’m using the word “actually” because I’ve started about a thousand food diaries and just ended up letting them go.) My doctor told me how important this is when I was describing some of my current symptoms to him. He said that it’s impossible to find out if the new symptoms I seem to be having an issue with are truly new without a diary of what I’m eating and what I’m feeling both physically and mentally. He said that illnesses often build on one another and that he cannot get to the root of my issue without seeing the patterns behind what I’m eating, thinking and feeling.

 If you are like me, you may want to try writing everything down by hand (I’m pretty old school myself). However, if you browse in your phone’s app store, there are a ton of apps that provide a place for you to log what you’ve eaten, the medications you’ve taken and how you’ve felt throughout each day. Some of them, like Symple, can actually take the data that you put in and create a report that you can give to your doctor.

  1. Use reliable sources. My second resolution is to make sure that any information that I get on celiac disease – and especially any that I give to you – is from a reliable source. Of course, I really try to do this anyway, but I intend to be extra careful this year. I tend to trust articles from The Celiac Disease Foundation, the Mayo Clinic, The Cleveland Clinic, Harvard Health Publishing and other articles published by trusted medical clinics. I vow to try never to put anything into this blog that has not been put out there by a source that we can all trust. Suzy Q. Blogger’s opinion on the safety of a new brand of potato chip is something that I will try not to put on this website without thoroughly researching it first. My doctor also pointed out to me a website that I was previously unfamiliar with called UpToDate.com. He said that it is a website with research-based articles that can be used by patients, but that is also a favorite place that medical practitioners go for the latest information on a number of subjects, including celiac disease. So, I will probably be using information from this website as well.
  2. Share knowledge. My last resolution is to push ahead and make more information available for everyone with celiac disease everywhere in the world. Think about it. If all the celiacs across the globe decided that they were really tired of being sick and of not being taken seriously by their doctors (if that is the case for them), we could create a huge demand for more research. Wouldn’t it be great to have answers to all of our questions? Perhaps we will not have all the answers in our lifetime, but more research now ensures a better quality of life for future generations of celiacs.

So, how do we do this? Well, the place that I’m starting is with my choice of a personal care physician. My old PCP was a very nice man, but he knew next to nothing about celiac disease and he really didn’t seem very interested in learning much about it or helping me get better. I’ve already taken the first step to fix this situation and that is that I have a new doctor. I believe this doctor is a better listener and is willing to actually help me figure out how to manage my condition and get well. (Isn’t that funny? When I was a kid, the only thing that came to my mind when I thought of being well was that I was definitely not going to get out of going to school. But now, the idea of being well haunts my dreams. I long to feel better. Don’t you?)

celiacThe second step that I’ve already begun to take is joining the iCureCeliac patient registry. This is a huge database of celiac patients that is being created by the Celiac Foundation. Once you create your patient profile, you take a long, long series of questionnaires about your disease, how you were diagnosed, your desired outcomes (like do you want celiac to be cured? Would you take medicine if it would mean you could eat whatever you want?). The purpose of this database to give researchers ideas on how to direct their research. Per their website: “Sharing your personal experience living with celiac disease helps researchers better understand the diverse and complex ways this disease impacts the lives of patients like you and your loved ones.”

You can join this data base at: https://celiac.org/icureceliac/

I truly believe that if we all push together by firstly taking charge of our health by managing our diets to the best of our ability, staying on top of the latest medical research and pushing our healthcare providers and the medical research community for answers they seem to be unable to give us at present, we can change life with gluten intolerance for ourselves and for our children for the better.

Happy New Year!

A Celiac Friendly Christmas Craft

By Rachel Sircy

I think I mentioned last year that I make Christmas ornaments for our friends and family every year. I have wanted to make homemade clay ornaments for some time, but I haven’t done it because most homemade clay recipes use wheat flour as a base for the clay. I try to keep my home and especially my kitchen as free as possible from contaminants and so I don’t bring wheat flour into my house at all. Once, I had the idea that I could use gluten free all-purpose flour to do the same job, but let’s face it, at more than $4 a pound, it would be cheaper to go out and buy ornaments than to make them out of gluten free flour.

But, I’ve found more and more lately that Pinterest has the answers to most of life’s problems. It was there that I came across pictures of lovely white ornaments made from cornstarch clay. In cornstarch clay, cornstarch and baking soda take the place of flour as the base of the clay. So, I had the answer to my homemade clay problem. Here is the recipe that I followed from a blog called, Kleinworth & Co.:

1 Cup Cornstarch

2 Cups Baking Soda

1 ½ cups Water

Combine all ingredients in a medium saucepan and heat over medium heat, stirring constantly. It takes a while, but the ingredients will eventually start to resemble mashed potatoes. Once you get to the mashed potato phase, scrape the mixture out into a glass bowl and cover with a damp kitchen towel and leave to cool for 30 minutes.

This is what it looks like cooking:

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And this is what it looks like in its mashed potatoes phase:

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At this point, you can roll out the clay and cut out shapes with a cookie or biscuit cutter. I also used a clay stamp and a metal button, to stamp the image of a crown and the words “Peace” and “Joy” into each ornament. Now, the point where I differ with Kleinworth & Co. is after the ornaments are made. Their recipe calls for the ornaments to be baked at 175 degrees for 30 minutes and then air-dried for another 24 hours. I found that this baking process actually dried out my ornaments too quickly and they ended up cracking. So, I actually threw out the first batch of ornaments that I had made and made a second batch, which I allowed to air-dry overnight on the plastic table cloth where I’d rolled them out, After that, I transferred them to cookie cooling racks and allowed them to dry out for about a week. This seems like a long time, but it kept my ornaments from cracking. If you need them to dry out sooner, I might recommend drying them for a shorter time in the oven and then allowing them to air-dry overnight.

Here is the finished product:

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And my daughter even got in on the ornament making fun.

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If your children are celiac, this is the perfect clay to allow them to make hand prints. There’s no risk of contamination with this clay. Although, of course, I wouldn’t exactly recommend letting them eat any!

Have fun and have a Merry Gluten Free Christmas!

Two Common Mistakes for Celiacs

By Rachel Sircy

When I was first diagnosed with celiac disease, I got some really bad advice from a well-meaning, but very misinformed dietitian. She said that I shouldn’t allow myself to go hungry just because I needed to eat gluten free. She said, if push came to shove, that I could just eat a sandwich or get a burger from McDonalds. Her primary concern was that I not feel that the gluten free diet was impossible and she thought that if I felt hungry, I might just give up altogether. She really did mean to do right by me, unfortunately, she advising me to start thinking in a really unhealthy way about my condition. She was teaching me that it is okay to cheat sometimes. However, cheating, when you are a celiac, isn’t the same as cheating on your diet when you’re trying to lose weight. The stakes are much higher and the damage that you will be doing to your body will be long lasting.

This story about my encounter with a dietitian highlights two of the most common problems that I have personally faced as a celiac. The first mistake sort of leads into the other, so I think it’s important to talk about them together.

Mistake #1: Letting yourself get hungry.

This is difficult, I know. The world is basically a food desert for celiacs and the gluten sensitive, especially when you’re travelling or in a hurry. So, what do you do? You become that person who always has food on them. People sometimes laugh at how much food I tend to carry with me, but I’ve learned the hard way that it’s never a good idea to let yourself get really hungry because that leads to eating things that you know you shouldn’t eat out of desperation. As bad as it is to go hungry, it truly is worse to cheat. You will never feel better if you are constantly setting yourself back with poor eating choices. Also, you are putting yourself at risk for damage that may take years to heal or may not heal at all, let alone the fact that you are increasing your risk of colon cancer, etc. Who wants to live like that?

And the worst part about making poor food choices is that it leads to mistake #2…

Mistake #2: Deciding whether you’ve had a reaction to gluten based on how your stomach (or body) feels.

This is one of the most detrimental mistakes I think that we celiacs make. While celiac disease does affect your stomach and intestines, it is really an autoimmune disorder. This means that the primary issue with celiac disease is not that your tummy hurts, it’s that your immune system doesn’t work right. It mistakenly attacks you instead of doing what it’s supposed to do, which is to protect you from germy invaders. Sometimes when your immune system attacks you, your stomach will hurt, or you will have constipation, diarrhea, headache, etc. But, sometimes when your immune system attacks you, you won’t feel anything. Your body, however, will still be damaged and that damage will cost you in terms of your health.

And, I’ve mentioned this before, but it’s worth saying again: don’t trust any supplement that promises to relieve a “gluten attack” or to alleviate symptoms of a gluten reaction. There is no scientific evidence that these supplements work. Remember, a reaction to gluten isn’t just an upset stomach, it’s an immune response. If those supplements make your stomach feel better, then go ahead and take them if you’ve mistakenly eaten gluten, just realize that they cannot reverse or even stop the damage that your immune system is unleashing on your body.

Tips and Advice for Gluten Free Beginners

By Rachel Sircy           

There are so many reasons for going gluten free. Of course, I mostly mention celiac disease because that is the reason that I have to be gluten free. However, there is a whole spectrum of gluten sensitivity that individuals can fall on. I also know of people who have a medical need to reduce inflammation in their bodies and for this reason they need to go gluten free.

Because there is a spectrum, there are all kinds of levels of gluten free living. I am at the extreme end of that spectrum and need to be completely gluten free all of the time. I cannot have food that has touched food with gluten in it, but there are many others who don’t need to be as careful. My advice will, of course, tend to be toward the extreme end of gluten free living, but I think it will still be helpful no matter where you are on the spectrum, or even if you are just trying to cut back on gluten. You can always include some gluten free ideas in your regular repertoire.

When I was first diagnosed with celiac disease, I was referred to a registered dietician to work out a plan to start a gluten free diet. What she told me is that when trying something new, it’s best not to totally re-invent the wheel. This was excellent advice because just walking into the natural foods store with the intention of overhauling your whole eating routine at once can be completely overwhelming. So, the best thing you can do is to focus for a while on some naturally gluten free recipes. The great thing is that with a few modifications, either by leaving something out or my adding some ingredients that you may already have on hand, you can make almost any recipe gluten free.

Here are two examples, one is naturally gluten free and one is something that you can modify to make gluten free:

Mediterranean Tuna Salad (Naturally gluten free)

Ingredients:

2   6.5oz cans of water-packed tuna, drained

1   15oz can of white beans, rinsed and drained (cannellini beans work best)

¼ cup finely chopped green onion

1 ½ cups diced cucumber

4 cups chopped baby spinach leaves

3 TBS Extra Virgin Olive Oil

3 TBS Dijon Mustard (check the label, but most mustard should be gluten free. Grainy or smooth Dijon work equally well)

3 TBS Freshly squeezed lemon juice

1 TBS Capers (Optional)

Avocado chunks (Optional)

Combine dry ingredients in a large bowl and stir in olive oil, mustard and lemon juice. Season with pepper and add capers and avocado chunks, if desired.

 

Potato Soup (Modified to be gluten free)

Ingredients

5 cups unpeeled red potato chunks, large dice

1 cup green onions, thinly sliced

½ tsp black pepper

1 TBS salt

1 generous TBS of butter

½ cup milk

Combine potatoes chunks, onions, salt and pepper and just barely cover with water. Boil until potatoes are tender. Add the butter and cook 5 more minutes. Add milk and cook 2-3 minutes more

**This recipe for potato soup is one that I modified from a traditional potato soup recipe that used flour to thicken the broth. At first, I tried things like rice flour and cornstarch to thicken the broth, but I disliked both of those. Finally, I decided to completely leave out the thickener. The result is that you have a potato soup with large chunks of potato and a thin, flavorful broth. My husband – who doesn’t even have to be gluten free – ended up liking the thin broth version so much that I’ve never tried to use another thickener. If you have a recipe that you would like to try, but it has one or two troubling ingredients, you can always experiment with leaving that ingredient out. You may find that you actually like the recipe better without it. And, I’ve modified many recipes that call for farrow, barley or couscous with either rice or quinoa and they’ve turned out just fine.

 

So, when in doubt, try a recipe that uses naturally gluten free ingredients, like the tuna salad, or if you’re feeling adventurous, try to substitute simple ingredients or leave them out!

Learning to Listen to Your Gut

By Rachel Sircy

This post is going to be short, since it’s basically a personal story without a whole bunch of evidence to back it up. I will start off by saying (as I’m sure I’ve said before), that I am a big believer in going to the doctor if you feel that something is wrong with you. I would strongly advise against anyone who thinks they have a gluten sensitivity beginning a gluten free diet without going through the proper tests first. There are a lot of reasons for this, but mainly the reason is that if you have celiac disease, you could also have a whole host of other problems that sometimes go along with it. If no doctor really diagnoses you, then no doctor will be looking out for your other symptoms either.

However, there are times when you need to listen to your gut. I am in the middle of learning this lesson myself. You see, some people with celiac disease can eat oats while others can’t. When I say “oats” I am talking only about the strictly certified gluten free oats. No one with a gluten sensitivity should eat just any old oats. Oats and wheat are often processed in the same factories, stored in the same silos and grown in adjacent fields. All this means that cross-contamination is inevitable in regular oats. Certified gluten free oats cost more than regular oats because they are grown in fields away from wheat and they are also stored and processed in gluten free facilities. So, when I talk about oats, I mean ONLY the oats with a label that claims that they are certified gluten free.

Okay, that being said, some people with celiac disease cannot digest even the cleanest, most certifiably gluten free oats. I am going to give you a basic run-down of why that is, though I may need some correction here. I really haven’t seen many articles on this that haven’t been really technical and scientific. There is a genetic component, I think, that is the cause of the additional sensitivity. There is a protein in the oats that is not related to gluten, but which some people are extremely sensitive to. I believe you can either be allergic to this protein in the oats or intolerant of it. (the same is true of gluten – some people are allergic, while celiacs like me are not allergic, but intolerant)

To be perfectly honest with everyone, I have thought for a number of years that I have an intolerance to oats, but I go back and forth on whether or not to eat them. There are two reasons that I have not made up my mind about whether or not to give oats up forever. Firstly, I LOVE oats. When I was a kid (many years before my celiac diagnosis), I would sneak into the pantry and grab handfuls of dry oats from the Quaker Oats box and eat them plain and uncooked, like a horse. I could eat oatmeal every day of my life and not grow tired of it. I could also probably give up desserts entirely if I just ate one of those dark chocolate chunk Kind granola bars instead. The second reason that I have hemmed and hawed about giving them up is that I figured that there was no test to prove that it was oats that I was allergic to. Plus, everything I read online about celiac disease and even about how to manage high cholesterol seems to indicate that we should eat oats. The arguments are that celiacs need more fiber in their diets and oats are the perfect way to get that fiber. The fiber that you get from oats is also really good for heart health and lowering cholesterol.

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However, for several years now, I have cut most oats and most oat containing products out of my diet – though I’ll admit I’m not a saint. I have relapses. Each time I relapse and eat my way through a box of gluten free granola bars, or eat oat-based cereals or crackers, etc. I get sick. I start having the same symptoms that I had before my celiac diagnosis: bloating, nausea, severe stomach cramps, fatigue – you name it. My most recent relapse ended last Wednesday when, after eating granola on my morning yogurt for about a month straight, I collapsed on the couch after work and just didn’t have the strength or energy to get up. My husband panicked, thinking I was either pregnant or sick with the flu. When I told him that I had been eating oats again, he just put his head in his hands and said “Why do you keep doing this to yourself?” And I finally realized that it was time to stop. I started looking online for answers about oat intolerance and, as it turns out, there is a test for it. So, my next step is going to be to speak to my doctor and try to get tested. A printout of lab results always makes me feel better. Those pieces of paper confirm that I am not a hypochondriac and my symptoms are not just in my head.

As I get further into this life lesson, I will be writing updates. Meanwhile, if anyone out there is a celiac and you’ve been on a gluten free diet for a long time and aren’t feeling any better, try cutting oats out for a while and seeing how you feel. Oats are an excellent source of nutrition if your body can handle them, but if you don’t feel good, they may not be good for you. Just food for thought.

A Meditation on the Benefits of Celiac Disease

by Rachel Sircy

I have been sick most of my life with various and seemingly unrelated symptoms ravaging my body. I have suffered body aches, severe fatigue, mental fog, mood swings, the inability to gain weight, borderline anemia and so on. No one ever imagined that these varied symptoms were possibly all related. Finally, when I was in my early 20’s and just married, I started to develop terrible gastric problems. Every time I ate I would experience such intense stomach pain that I would have to lay down for a while. It got to the point that I wasn’t able to eat more than about a handful of food at a time. I dreaded going to the doctor for these problems, but my husband put his foot down and told me that I could either go to the doctor on my own, or he would drag me there himself. I was afraid I had an ulcer. My husband was afraid that I had stomach cancer. The symptoms had gotten that bad.

Before I went to the doctor, I prayed a simple prayer: that no matter what the diagnosis, I would not have to be on medicine my entire life. The thought of taking pills every single day was something that I dreaded. I got what I prayed for, but my answered prayer turned out to be much more burdensome than I had expected. Instead of taking one or two pills every day, I would have to completely change my relationship with food, what I ate and how I cooked. For the first few eight months or so after my diagnosis, I lived in a sort of denial. I thought that perhaps I had been misdiagnosed or that perhaps if I prayed hard enough, I would be miraculously healed. I do believe in miracles, but no miracle was in my future. Or, rather, the miracle that I got was not the one that I wanted. I refused to stay on a strict gluten free diet for that first eight months and I even went back to the gastroenterologist to try to talk him into retesting me and seeing if he had been mistaken. I stayed sick and when I went back to the gastroenterologist, he told me that there was no need to retest. The tests, he told me, had come out clear as day. There was no mistake in the diagnosis. He actually looked at me and said that he was sorry that I had celiac disease, but “that’s the way the cookie crumbles.”

I was fairly distraught after that. One night, alone in my room, I knelt down by the bed and cried, begging God to heal me and let me go back to the way of cooking and eating that I had always known. In that moment, crazy as it may sound, I think I heard from God. I didn’t hear an audible voice or anything, but an idea came to my mind so strongly, an idea that was so contrary to everything that I had been thinking and praying, that I knew the idea didn’t originate with me. The idea was something like this: Do I really need to be healed so that I can continue to eat powdered doughnuts and McDonald’s hamburgers? No, the point of this disease would be to serve as a constant physical reminder that it isn’t okay to just fuel my body (or my soul) with easily accessible junk. I was going to have to think about what I ate. I was going to have to put the health of my body before my cravings. Somehow, that night, I understood that this new way of relating to food, would make me a more careful and purposeful person. Not just physically, but mentally, emotionally and spiritually. Each time I drive down the road wondering what I’m going to do for dinner and thinking that my life would be so much easier if I could just pull over for fast food, I am reminded that food is for nourishment. My lifestyle is difficult because I choose nourishment over convenience. It has occurred to me since that night that this is a spiritual discipline as well as a physical one. This gluten free lifestyle is my own personal sacrament. Deuteronomy 30:19 records God’s statement to the Israelites: “[…] I have set before you life and death, blessing and cursing: choose life.”

This blog post was really supposed to be about the possibilities of a cure for celiac disease. Pharmaceutical companies are working even as you read this on drugs that could cure celiacs via immunotherapy drugs or protect celiacs from gluten contamination by creating drugs that isolate gliadin (the protein that causes the violent auto-immune response in celiacs) and making it undigestible. At first, I thought that anything that could cure celiac disease would be a welcome answer to prayer, but as I began to write, I realized that my prayer was answered years ago. Choosing life is never an easy decision, but it is one that is well worth it. Almost 10 years into my diagnosis I am a healthier person all the way around. I’m not saying that everyone should avoid these drugs or therapies if they ever become available. By all means, if you can become healthier through better science, I say that is a good thing. But as for me, I think I will continue to do things the hard way, choosing to remember that the ability to deny myself means that I am not a slave to my cravings. There is a great freedom in self-discipline.

Just something to think about…

Gluten-Free Traveling

By: Rachel Sircy                 

My last post was about some ways that you can stay gluten-free in an emergency. This post is going to be about a few things that I tend to do when I am traveling to help make sure that I don’t get contaminated.

Be Prepared: This is something that people will always tell you when you’re traveling anywhere whether you’re gluten-free or not. The thing is, when you have a severe allergy or intolerance, you really do have to be prepared to feed yourself. Never trust that you’ll be able to just find something to eat. Believe me, when I was first diagnosed I made the mistake of thinking that I could just “find something,” on a road trip. Those road trips were horrible and ended in tears. I’m not a person who does well when she’s hungry.

What do I mean by prepared, you might ask. Well…this is a picture of my toaster. It’s not fancy and it cost approximately $7 at Walmart.

This toaster goes where I go. It fits pretty well into the Aldi grocery bag that I use to carry my food for the trip in. If I am staying at a hotel where they serve continental breakfast, I will     sometimes check to see if they have any brands of yogurt that I know are gluten-free and I will perhaps take a banana, but mostly I bring my own bread and peanut butter (or Glutino toaster pastries if I don’t feel like being health conscious) and make my own breakfast in my room.

It’s also a good idea if you’re traveling to an unfamiliar destination to pack easy to eat non-perishable snacks for the trip like food bars (Larabar, Clif Organic Trail Mix Bar, etc) and high    protein snacks like gluten-free nuts and jerky (most flavors of Krave, Oberto All Natural and Epic jerky are gluten-free, but always read the labels because things that contain Teriyaki are usually NOT gluten-free). I’ve also heard of people who travel with cans of tuna and a small can opener and some crackers so that if they find that they have nothing else for dinner, they won’t go hungry. I personally don’t like fish so that doesn’t work for me. The tuna thing probably wouldn’t work on an airplane, but there are travel containers of both peanut butter and hummus. Some bananas, crackers, and vegetables could turn a container of either peanut butter or hummus into a small meal. Remember that it is never a good idea to just wing it when your health is at stake. Don’t allow yourself to get hungry out there on the road or you will be tempted to eat things that will make you sick!

2) Call Ahead: Anytime you’re staying with friends or relatives have a good conversation about what you can and can’t eat and also how your food must be prepared. Lots of well-meaning people don’t know what is or is not contaminated by gluten, so help them out. Make sure Aunt Susie knows that she can’t just pick the croutons out of your salad before she serves it to you and that the kitchen must be thoroughly cleaned after she rolls out pie dough on the counter before she cooks anything for you for dinner.

Once, my husband and I stayed in a bed and breakfast in Charleston and my husband had the foresight to call the owner when we made our reservations and tell him that I had dietary restrictions. He gave us leave to use the kitchen to cook food for ourselves and we also got to talk to the cook about what I could eat for breakfast. During that stay, we met a woman who also had to be gluten-free, but who hadn’t called ahead to let the owner know about it and, unfortunately, she had quite a time trying to eat around all the contaminated food on her plate. So, don’t be afraid to tell people up front about your needs and just let them know (gently) that if they are unable to meet those needs, you won’t be able to stay with them.

3) Try a Gluten-Free Destination: That may sound a bit out there at first, but there are two celiac friendly travel destinations in either direction of Columbia. Charleston is a pretty food-forward city and while the cost of its trendy restaurants may mean that you can’t eat there all the time, many of those restaurants offer gluten-free meals (it is still quite the fad in dieting to be gluten-free). If you travel in the other direction, Asheville, NC has been featured in Delight magazine and, most recently, in Gluten-Free Living as a gluten-free travel destination. I have mentioned before (and I will keep mentioning it) that there is a restaurant in Asheville called Posana that serves exclusively gluten-free food. Not only is their food (and I do mean ALL of their food) gluten-free, but it is also delicious. Seriously, I dream about their fried green tomatoes with pimento cheese sauce and also their lemon blueberry cheesecake sometimes. It is a bit pricey as well, but it is a great place for a special occasion or a treat. These cities are great if you’re looking for a day trip or a weekend getaway.

These are just a few of the things that I have learned from trying to travel and stay safe. Life’s a journey. Travel with a dependable toaster.