Here’s an idea …

By Jeanne Reynolds

Tube lights? Really? (imagine vomit emoji here)

That was pretty much our reaction when the architect designing our new home suggested placing lights on the top of the exposed beams in our main living area. We pictured large, ugly tubes like the florescent lights in many garages. How could this respected (and frankly, pricey) architect make such a hideous recommendation?ceiling beams

Well, it turns out they weren’t tube lights like that at all. They’re long, thin strips of tiny light dots that shine upward, creating a subtle, radiant glow toward the high ceiling. You can’t see the lights themselves at all. And guess what? We. Love. Them.

It’s funny looking back at our quick and extremely negative reaction to an idea that’s ended up being one of our favorite things about this home. There are some good lessons embedded in that experience. In no particular order:

  1. When you hire experts because they’re, well, experts – listen to them. We contracted with an architect because our marsh-front lot, while lovely, is awkwardly shaped. Flip through the big book of Southern Living plans and plop one down on the spot? No such luck. It took a lot of skill to fit what we wanted in the space available. Yes, it’s our home, and the architect’s Frank Lloyd Wright modern vision sometimes rubbed against our old Southern farmhouse tastes, but the end result still thrills me after three years.
  2. Be open to new ideas. The beam lights are far from the only example of ideas the architect pushed for, we resisted – and now love. There are the half-tint ceilings (aren’t ceilings supposed to be white?), the kitchen cabinets that are actually drawers (what in the world would I want that for?) and the dark green garage doors (can’t even remember what I assumed there, but it wasn’t that). It doesn’t hurt to at least listen (see above) and consider another viewpoint, even if you ultimately decide …
  3. It’s OK to say no (thank you). Work with experts and listen to their ideas, but know your deal-breakers and your bottom line. We didn’t need or want high-end light fixtures, designer appliances or drawer pulls costing thousands of dollars (there are a lot of drawers and cabinets in this house) when good-quality, attractive alternatives are available at the hardware store or through discount retailers. We were up front about our budget limitations and weren’t intimidated into getting in over our heads.

 

I wish I could say I’ve learned these lessons once and for all, but I seem to have to keep wash-rinse-and-repeating. At work, at church, even on the golf course, I’m still a slow learner:

Golf pro: “Try that long chip with a hybrid.”

Me: “What? That’ll never work.”

Me again: “Oh, wait, you’re the golf pro and I’m paying you for this coaching. OK, I’ll try it.”

If only I could get those tube lights for my brain.

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