Resolutions rewind

by Jeanne Reynolds

This time last year I posted that I don’t make New Year’s resolutions. Instead, I like to set a few new goals each year.

To recap those thoughts, goals focus on accomplishment rather than fixing what’s wrong. They feel positive instead of punitive. I may not achieve all my goals in any given year, but putting them in writing helps me clarify what’s important to me.

What I rarely do, though, is pull the list back out and check my progress toward those goals. Yeah, I kind of know in my head the big things I accomplished during the year. (Some of them end up in my Christmas letter, when I get around to doing one. Christmas letters: love them or hate them? Discuss among yourselves.)

Since I went “public” with my goals last year, I thought it only fair to share the results. And two things surprised me:

  1. I had forgotten most of the items on the list.
  2. I did better than I thought.

Here’s a look:

 

  • Run a half-marathon in under 2:05. Yes! I ran the Palmetto Half at Sandhills in
  • 2:03 and change. I have to confess this wasn’t exactly a stretch goal since it’s waaay slower than I used to run, but coming off some injuries it seemed reasonable.
  • Paint our bedroom and get new linens and towels. Yes! We ended up getting nearly the whole inside of the house painted a calming gray. Love. It. For those interested, I went with an all-white bed and mossy green towels in the master bath.
  • Obtain and complete at least 3 freelance writing jobs. Didn’t take even the first step toward this, except in my mind. Realistically, this won’t happen until I can cut back my hours on my “real” job. Maybe this year.
  • Lower my golf handicap to 14. Surprisingly, yes! I had some good rounds in the summer and fall, bringing it down to 13 something. Of course with our recent weather I’ll be back where I started, but at least I know it’s possible.
  • Finish the first phase of landscaping in the natural area of our Cat Island home. Hmm, sort of? Another pesky hurricane drained a good bit of our resources but we’re making progress. Unfortunately, a couple rows of wax myrtles that will one day be a huge hedge aren’t yet making a dent in the use of our yard as the neighborhood ball field (you can probably hear my husband saying “I told you so” in the background). But someday … And we did plant four new trees to replace some of those lost in the 2016 hurricane.
  • Take a special getaway trip to celebrate a milestone birthday. Not yet – see hurricanes above. Instead, the trip will be this year to celebrate our 25th wedding anniversary. Rome, Tuscany and Amalfi coast, here we come.Italy guidebook

So now it’s time to set some goals for 2018. I’m going to take a little longer to think about that. But based on points 1 and 2 above, I realize it’s not the goals themselves but the act of setting them that matters. Most of us get so busy just charging through each day, we seldom stop to think about where we’re going. Just taking some time to think about what’s important to me – and what I might be willing to do to reach it – is a good goal in itself.

Remembering the Sabbath Day

By Chaunte McClure

Growing up in the South, particularly in the Pee Dee region of South Carolina with my grandparents, there were just some things you didn’t do on Sundays. For most of my childhood Grandma and Granddaddy didn’t work, rather they spent all day at home doing his and her tasks. Grandma cooked, cleaned and cared for a few of her grands while Granddaddy kept the yard mowed, tended the chickens and the garden and did handy work in and outside our cinderblock house.

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With the exception of cooking, we completed most tasks by Saturday night because, in our house, they remembered the Sabbath Day and hallowed it. That meant no: cleaning (except dishes, of course), washing clothes, ironing, sewing, cleaning cars or mowing. No one, that I can recall, had a problem with that because that was the norm.

Honestly, I’m not sure if that was a religious or cultural practice, but after living in a larger city, I’ve noticed that for many families, Sunday is the day to get all the housework and yard work done.

In the summer, forget sleeping in a little later on Sunday because the sleep you’ve been longing for all week is bound to get interrupted by the sound of a lawnmower. And because you’re sleeping so well, the mower actually sounds like an antique John Deere tractor.

In my household, we’re guilty of ironing on Sunday mornings because we don’t always choose our Sunday outfits Saturday night. Sometimes I think about Grandma while I stand in the laundry room ironing. I visualize her with her hand on her hip giving me “the look” – the now-you-know-better-than-that look. And I do know better, but I wonder if others don’t or because they are now adults they live by their own rules and not necessarily by what their parents and/or grandparents taught them. For many families, I’m sure Sunday is the only day to get it done because of work schedules.

What about you? Are chores forbidden at your home on Sunday?

Do You, Can You, Will You, Have a Sense of Freedom About You?

By Shannon Boatwright

 

“Every woman that finally figured out her worth, has picked up her suitcase of pride and boarded a flight to freedom, which landed in the valley of change.”

  • Shannon L. Alder

As we journey into a new year, I want us to start with as much confidence, hope and positivity that we can grasp hold of. Ironically, as I write this blog entry, I’m quite honestly not feeling very confident and actually have a hint of depression with a side of insecurity. I’m aware of my worth, my skills, my talents & most importantly, my blessings. At my core, I know I’ve got this. Yet, in this moment, I’m hesitant and leery of starting a new year, one that will bring an incredibly busy rest of the school year (one in which just the thought tends to overwhelm me.) This past year there were people I’d hoped to reconnect with, things I would’ve liked to accomplish personally and adventures I wanted to experience with my kids. I have a birthday coming soon and I’m not doing so well with this whole getting older thing. Any woman reading this entry I’m sure will feel me on the issue of dealing with getting older. Though I love the getting wiser part, the physical aging part of the equation certainly has its moments.

That being said, I decided to share the quote above because, well, I think it’s fabulous. I’m a fan of actress and rocker, Juliette Lewis and she recently posted this quote on her Instagram. She’s a firecracker of positivity and I think she rocks. So, in my moment of feeling a bit down, this quote was what I needed.

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Have you ever noticed that in your moments of strength and positivity – you know, those times when your confidence is actually at a healthy level – that you indeed have a sense of freedom about you? Yea, those moments are lovely. It’s in those moments that we’re willing to reach for our own positive change, better directions and ultimately create the change that makes a better YOU. And those moments are moments I think we should experience more of!

In light of a crazy past year, let’s look forward in this beautiful future we have the privilege of living, and live it with an air of total confidence, recognizing our worth, taking pride in our many talents, ready at every moment to celebrate our freedom to accept that the fact is, we totally rock.

The sooner we can see that, recognize that and accept that, the sooner we can create it. No matter what your age, range, size or level in life, take pride in your skills & your goddess beauty, inside and out. Freedom awaits. 🙂

 

Toast the Season with Christmosas

By Mary Pat Baldauf

I have always enjoyed a good mimosa, the classic mix of champagne and orange juice, so I was intrigued when I saw a recipe for “Christmas Mimosas” on Pinterest.

Aside from a shot of Bailey’s in my morning coffee, Christmas day is generally pretty quiet for my family. My sister and I, both single without children, spend the night with my mother. We eat, sleep, put together puzzles, take a ride to see lights and exchange gifts – mostly relax and spend time with one another. But something about those “Christmosas” caught my eye, so I added them to my to–do list.

The ingredients are pretty simple; I picked up the grape juice and champagne during one of my many shopping trips and asked Sister to get the rest during hers.  I chilled the juice and prosecco and used frozen pomegranate seeds. I pre-chopped the grapes and bought sliced green apples and chilled those, too. I also popped the bag of cranberries, which are so plentiful during the holidays, in the freezer.

Come Christmas morning, I just tiptoed into the kitchen and put everything in a pitcher. (I did make a couple of adjustments. I didn’t have time to chop the apples finer, so didn’t add them. The cranberries were lovely, but not so good to eat, so I’ll probably add fewer next time.) Once Sister and Mom were up, we made a toast to my father, who passed away six years ago, and mark the passage of another year of fun and antics as the “Baldauf Chicks.”

This could definitely be the start of a new tradition. They were as pretty as they were delish, Sister and I sipped on them all day. (Mom was dizzy from a holiday illness, so we limited her to one.) So whether you save this to your holiday folder or make a batch for your next winter event, you can’t go wrong with these Christmosas.

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Christmas Mimosas (aka Christmosas)

Ingredients

  • 2 Granny Smith apples, chopped
  • 1 c. whole fresh cranberries
  • 1 c. green grapes, halved
  • 1 c. pomegranate seeds (also known as arils)
  • 1 c. sparkling grape juice
  • 1 bottle champagne, prosecco or cava

Directions

  1. In a large pitcher or punch bowl, add apples, cranberries, grapes and pomegranate seeds. Pour over sparkling grape juice and champagne just before serving.

 

 

 

 

Health Tips for Every Decade

Carolina Women’s Physicians, a Lexington Medical Center physician practice, is celebrating its 10th anniversary. The practice has provided comprehensive obstetric and gynecology care for women in the Midlands for a decade. In recognition of that milestone, the practice offers tips for women in all decades of life.

CWP Group Outside_2017

 

20s

Nearly 20 million cases of sexually transmitted diseases occur each year. Most happen in women under the age of 25. Because some have no symptoms, it’s important for women in their 20s to see a health care provider regularly. In addition, symptoms such as odor, discharge and pelvic pain require immediate attention. Some infections can cause complications that could lead to infertility. Doctors can perform simple tests to make a diagnosis and prescribe treatment.

 

30s

Premenstrual syndrome peaks for women in their 30s for several reasons. First, women’s bodies are not as forgiving compared with earlier in life.  Secondly, women in their 30s are at higher risk for depression, stress and obesity. And, it’s more difficult to clear excess calories from alcohol and caffeine, which can result in lack of sleep. Making simple changes to a daily routine can prevent premenstrual syndrome. Get eight hours of sleep each night, exercise 3 to 4 times per week, eat nutritious foods and pay attention to calories.

 

40s

The five years leading up to menopause can be filled with irritability, memory changes and sleep problems. Metabolism can begin to slow down and menstrual cycles will fluctuate. These are symptoms of perimenopause and can be treated with hormonal and non-hormonal methods. It’s also important to eat a diet that’s high in protein and low in carbohydrates to diminish the risk of heart disease and diabetes.

 

50s

Many women believe that changes will slow down and they will start to relax in this season of life. However, the risk of depression can increase and is very common in women in their 50s. Symptoms such as changes in appetite, shortened sleep cycles, weight gain and apathy can be signs of depression and anxiety. A combination of medicine and therapy are the most effective ways to treat chronic and situational depression. Remaining engaged in long-time friendships, traveling and exercise can also help.

 

Carolina Women’s Physicians has locations in West Columbia and Irmo. Visit CarolinaWomensPhysicians.com or call (803) 936 – 7590 for an appointment.